LL 302: Externship: Migration Studies from a Personal Lens

Course Syllabus

Term: Autumn 2018-19

Instructor:     Shana Wills
                        swills@depaul.edu
                    773-266-0709 (cell)

Course Dates: September 5 – November 20, 2018
Course Location and Delivery Format: Online

Course Description

This course is designed to address the Externship component of the School for New Learning, focusing on the topic of migraton and newcomer integration. Students will examine the "migrant in all of us" through an exploration of their own roots of migration and through service learning / research experiences with refugees and other immigrants. Students will reflect on the social, moral, and ethical issues of their service learning experiences, while also examining the reasons that people migrate, the elements they leave behind, the challenges and opportunities they encounter as newcomers, and the resources that are necessary for their successful integration. The different typologies of migration will be discussed, from “voluntary” migration to “involuntary” migration. Students will also learn the basic profiles and characteristics of various migrant populations, such as refugees, asylees, victims of trafficking, undocumented immigrant youth, and immigrant entrepreneurs. Throughout this course, students will consider their learning styles by revisiting David Kolb’s Learning Style Inventory, developing ways of expanding their learning repertoires, and examining their own theories or ideas as well as those of experts. This course meets the requirements of Life Long Learning domain competencies (LL10 and LL11) by providing experiential learning, individual reflection, group processing and feedback, holistic theory and praxis, and integration of learning styles.  

1. Learning Outcomes or Competencies

After completing this course, you will be able to:

In this course, you will develop the following competencies:

Competence

Competence Statement and Criteria

LL-10

Can reflect on the learning process and methods used in an experiential project.

LL-11

Can reflect on one's service learning experience and family’s story of migration, understand the common and varied factors behind migration, and comment on the resources necessary for successful integration into a new society.

How the Competences will be Demonstrated in this Course

LL-10: Students will use Kolb's four-stage learning cycle and results from the Learning Style Inventory to determine which styles need to be strengthened and which styles offer the best opportunity for deeper learning. Students will address the three major areas: identifying and developing personal learning styles in and out of the classroom, researching and reflecting on issues and stories of immigration, and a minimum of 20 hours of service learning activities related to newcomer integration. Through weekly online course discussions, journal writing and feedback from course instructor, students will reflect upon and adapt their learning style approaches in order to achieve their personal learning goals.

LL-11: Students will use Kolb's four-stage learning cycle and results from the Learning Style Inventory to determine which styles need to be strengthened and which styles offer the best opportunity for deeper learning about the immigrant experience. Through this process, students will read and analyze course readings, conduct independent research (via family interviews, media resources, and academic sources), and synthesize key findings to present in weekly online course discussions, reflection journals, and a final project.

2. Learning Strategies & Resources

Course Textbook:
Roberts, Steven V. From Every End of This Earth: 13 Families and the New Lives They Made in America. New York: Harper Collins Publishers. 2009. To buy your books, go to http://depaul-loop.bncollege.com.

Mandatory Online Assessment:
All students are required to purchase ($35) and complete the Kolb Learning Style Inventory,version 3.1 online, which can be purchased at http://bit.ly/hay-lsi.

Please note: If you already have a print copy of the LSI (3.1) from a previous course, you may use that. For this course you will, however, be required to copy, scan, and upload the kite graph and list the numbers associated with your inventory results and attach it as a document or pdf to the course assignment dropbox. If you are not able to upload a final graph or numbers that demonstrate that you have already taken the LSI through the Foundations course, purchasing the above resource is required.

Other course readings can be found on E-Reserves, Course Resources, or on the World Wide Web. Follow the instructions in the Readings and Assignments section of each Course Module to locate required readings, instructional handouts, and service learning forms.

3. Learning Deliverables (graded evidences of learning)

1.Participation in Online Discussions and Activities (LL-10 and LL-11)

2. Reflection Journals (LL-10 and LL-11)

3.Personal Interviews & Written Summary of Interviews (LL-10 and LL-11)

4. Service Learning Hours (LL-10 and LL-11)

5. Final Project (LL-10 and LL-11)
Students will have the option to choose between submitting a written paper or a creative artifact that focuses on alternative learning styles and methods to present their experiences in this course.

4. Assessment of Student Learning

To complete the course, students must complete each of the assignments as described in the course and submit them to the instructor by the assigned deadline. Students must also participate in the course discussion forum by responding to all instructor requests and by interacting with fellow classmates as necessary. Finally, all students will need to complete 20 hours of service at a site that provides services to refugee and/or immigrant newcomers.

Points are deducted for late work.

Assessment Criteria for All Writing Assignments
All writing assignments are expected to conform to basic college-level standards of mechanics and presentation. Grading rubrics are provided for each written assignment within this course.

Students should consider visiting the Writing Center to discuss written assignments for this course or any others. Students may schedule appointments (30 or 50 minutes) on an as–needed or weekly basis, scheduling up to 3 hours worth of appointments per week. Online services include Feedback–by–Email and IM conferencing (with or without a webcam). All writing center services are free. Students should schedule their appointments with enough time to think about and use the feedback they’ll receive. To schedule a Face-to-Face, Written Feedback by Email, or Online Appointment, visit www.depaul.edu/writing.

Assessment of Online Discussion Assignments
Discussion Forums are an important component of the online experience. This course contains discussion forums related to the topics students are studying each week. For requirements on your participation in the Discussion Forums, please see "Course Expectations" in the syllabus.

A Course Q & A discussion forum will be established to manage necessary, ongoing social and administrative activities. This is where the management and administrative tasks of the course are conducted, and where students can ask 'process' questions and receive answers throughout the course. Students should feel free to answer any question if they feel they know the answer; this sharing of information is valuable to other students.

Assessment of Service Learning Requirement
Students will be required to complete 20 hours of service learning to meet the
criteria for externship. A completed Timesheet, documenting at least 20 hours of service learning, must be signed by student and their service learning site supervisor and uploaded to the course submission box in order to receive a passing grade for this course.

 

5. Grading Criteria & Scale

This course is designed as a Pass/Fail course. Students may elect to take the class for a letter grade according to the scale below. For SNL courses taken for Pass/Fail, a “Pass” represents a grade of “A” for purposes of financial aid and employer reimbursement.

Course Grading Scale (if Letter Grade is requested):

A = 95 to 100

A- = 91 to 94

B+ = 88 to 90

B = 85 to 87

B- = 81 to 84

C+ = 77 to 80

C = 73 to 76

C- = 69 to 72

D+ = 65 to 68

D = 61 to 64

F = 60 or below

INC

Please note: Grades lower than a C- do not earn credit or competence at the School for New Learning. Students wishing to be graded on this letter grade scale must inform the course instructor of this preference before the end of the 2nd week of the quarter. After the 2nd week, requests for a change in the grading basis cannot be approved.

Weight of Mandatory Assignments

6. Course Schedule

This course consists of ten modules. The estimated time to complete each module is one week.

The following table outlines the course:

Week,  Module # and Title

Readings

Assignments

Week 1, Module 1: Community Building / Course Overview

Read Syllabus. Selecting a Community Service Externship Organization.

Read The Community Conduct & Safety Tips Document.

Read Service Learning Guidelines and Student Information Sheet

Review University of Leeds. Kolb Learning Style Tutorial.

Watch video: Course Instructor Shana Wills, Introduction to Course, 5 min.

Read Roberts, Steven V. From Every End of This Earth, Introduction: pp. viii-xxiv.

Review UNHCR Global Population Map

Review IOM Migrant Facts & Figures Infographic

1.1 Community Building Discussion

1..2 Service Learning Guidelines & Student Information Sheet

1.3 Kolb's Experiential Learning Model Discussion

1.4 Perceptions of Migration and "The Immigrant" Discussion

Week 2, Module 2: Styles and Patterns

Complete the Learning Style Inventory questionnaire at http://bit.ly/hay-lsi. (This is an online assessment that costs $35 to complete. You will need the results to complete Assignment 2.2 LSI Learning Cycle

Browse website links to various service learning sites (organizations that serve immigrants)

Read UNHCR’s Refugees (2007) “Refugee or Migrant”, pp. 2-12

Read Migration Issues Brief. Globalization 101. “Introduction”, “Brief History of Migration”, and “Why Does Migration Happen?”

Read Nwosu, Chiamaka, et al. “Frequently Requested Statistics on Immigrants & Immigration in the U.S.” Migration Policy Institute (April 2014).

2.1 LSI Outcomes

2.2 LSI & Learning Cycle Discussion

2.3 Service Site Selections Worksheet

2.4 Key Characteristics of Immigrant Populations Discussion

Week 3, Module 3: Forced Migration & the Refugee Experience

Read Stewart, Greig M. “Learning Styles as a Filter for Developing Service Learning Interventions.” Community Service as Values Education.

Read the Steans Center’s Service Learning Agreement

Review Statue of Liberty Ellis Island Foundation Website

Read Char Bah’s Story. ”Putting My Family Back Together.”

Read Roberts, Steven V. From Every End of This Earth, “Part 1: The Survivors.” Pp. 3-48.

Read UNHCR “The Town That Loved Refugees” Refugees vol 1, no 138, pp. 4-31

 

3.1 Learning Goals Worksheet

3.2 Service Learning Agreement

3.3 Statue of Liberty Ellis Island Foundation Website Registration & Family Interview Info

3.4 Forced Migration Discussion

Week 4, Module 4: Personal History & the Asylum Seeker's Experience

Review Statue of Liberty Ellis Island Foundation Website

Read Roberts, Steven. V. “Part 1: The Survivors” From Every End of Earth. Pp. 49-68

Watch the excerpt from A Well-Founded Fear by POV Films

Read Final Project Assignment Instructions

4.1 Preliminary Interview Questions

4.2 Making One's Case Discussion

4.3 Final Project Proposal

Week 5, Module 5: Modern Slavery & the Victim of Trafficking Experience

Read King, Martin Luther, Jr. On Being a Good Neighbor

Read Loeb, Paul. “We Don’t Have to Be Saints,” Soul of A Citizen, pp. 34-49

Read Farmer, Paul. “Epiphany, Metanoia, Praxis: Turning Road Angst into Hope – and Action.” To Repair the World, pp. 20-30.

Read Bales, Kevin and Soodalter, Ron. The Slave Next Door, 2009. Pp. 163-194

Read Bales, Kevin. The Challenge: Understanding the World of New Slavery. Ending Slavery, pp. 5-20.

Read Migration Issues Brief. Globalization 101. “Human Trafficking”

Watch the excerpt from Dreams Die Hard: Survivors of Slavery in America Tell Their Stories by Free The Slaves

Read Journal Reflection Assignment Instructions and Rubric

5.1 Hope, Angst, and Community Engagement Discussion

5.2 Journal Reflection One

Week 6, Module 6: Identity, Status, & the Immigrant Youth Experience

Read Chavez, Maria, et al. “Living in Limbo: Neither Here Nor There and the Concept of Citizenship.” Living the Dream, New Immigration Policies and the Lives of Undocumented Latino Youth, Pp. 78-106.

Watch the excerpt from Papers: Stories of Undocumented Youth by Graham Street Productions

Read Halpern, Diane. Thought and Knowledge: An Introduction to Critical Thinking (Fifth Edition, 2014). Pp. 2-8, 18-26

Read Personal Interviews Instructions

6.1 Identity and Status Discussion

6.2 Written Summary of Personal Interviews

Week 7, Module 7: The Professional & Entrepreneurial Immigrant's Experience

Read Roberts, Steven V. “Part IV: The Professionals” From Every End of This Earth, pp. 163-234.

Watch the excerpt from New Americans: Episode 3 by Kartemquin Films

Read Journal Reflection Assignment Instructions and Rubric

Read Final Project Assignment Instructions

Read The New American’ Fortune 500 , a report by the Partnership for a New American Economy, June 2011.

7.1 Motivation Behind Immigrant Innovation

7.2 Journal Reflection Two

7.3 Revised Final Project Proposal

Week 8, Module 8:Immigrant Integration Efforts

Read Daloz, Laurent A. “Conviction: Developing Critical Habits of Mind”, pp. 102-124.

Read Jiminez, Tomas. “Immigrants in the United States: How Well Are They Integrating into Society?” Migration Policy Institute, pp. 4-17.

Watch Chapter 1: The Story of Welcoming and Chapter 4: Welcoming Messages: A Changing Perception of Immigrants by Shelbyville Multimedia.

8.1 Habits of Mind

8.2 Elements for Successful Integration

Week 9, Module 9: Immigrant Rights and Policy Issues

Read Immigration Policy Center's "How the United States Immigration System Works: A Fact Sheet," pp. 1-6

Read Giovagnoli, Mary. "Overhauling Immigration Law: A Brief History and Basic Principles of Reform," pp. 1-9.

9.1 Immigrant Rights & Policy Discussion

Week 10, Module 10: Reflection on Externship Experience

Review Kolb's Learning Cycle Infographic.

Read Final Project Instructions

Complete Timesheet

10.1 Course Reflection Discussion

10.2 Final Project Presentation

10.3 Final Signed Timesheet

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7. Course Policies

Time Management and Attendance
SNL's online courses are not self-paced and require a regular time commitment EACH week throughout the quarter.

Students are required to log in to the course at least four times a week so that they can participate in the ongoing course discussions.

Online courses are no less time consuming than "face to face" courses. Students will have to dedicate some time every day or at least every second day to their studies. A typical four credit hour "face to face" course at SNL involves three hours of classroom meeting per week, plus at least three to six hours of study and homework per week. This course will require at least the same time commitment, but students’ learning activities will be spread out through the week. If students have any problems with course technology, or if they need to improve their reading or writing skills, it may take even longer.

The instructor should be notified if certain life events do not allow students to participate in the course and the online discussions for more than one week. This is particularly important when there are group discussions or students are working as part of a team.

If students find themselves getting behind, please contact the instructor immediately.

The Instructor's Role
The instructor's role in this course is that of a discussion facilitator and learning advisor. It is not their responsibility to make sure students log in regularly and submit timely assignments. As instructor, s/he will read all postings to the general discussion forums on a daily basis but may not choose to respond to each posting. Students will receive feedback to assignments.

The instructor may choose to designate "office hours" when s/he will be online and available and will immediately respond to questions. Depending on the instructor, this response may be by e-mail, instant messenger or telephone. Otherwise, students will generally receive a response to emailed or posted queries within 48 hours.

The Student’s Role
As an online participant, students will be taking a proactive approach to their learning. As the course instructor's role is that of a learning guide, the student’s role is that of the leader in his/her own learning.

Students must manage their own time well so that they can complete the readings, activities and assignments for the course, and students will also be expected to take a more active role in peer learning.

Please also note that this is a course offered by DePaul University's School for New Learning (SNL), a college for undergraduate and graduate degree-seeking students 24 years and older. SNL welcomes the perspectives and encourages the participation of all DePaul students, and students who take this course should respect and be mindful of SNL's mission in supporting a diverse and inclusive environment.

Course Netiquette
Online discussions are an important part of this course experience. To ensure a positive learning environment, students should follow the following minimum expectations, and use their common sense, as not all situations can be covered:

Standard University Policies
This course includes and adheres to the college and university policies described in the links below:

8. Other Resources for Students

University Center for Writing-based Learning

SNL Writing Guide

Dean of Students Office

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9. Instructor Brief Bio

Shana Wills is the Founder & Executive Director of Refugee Education & Adventure Challenge (REACH), which provides refugee youth and families with experiential learning opportunities focused on STEAM-related education and adventure sports. In addition, Shana serves as an independent consultant for refugee and immigrant service providers in Chicago. Shana is also an instructor for Northwestern University Center for Forced Migration Studies’ annual Summer Institutes and for DePaul University’s Graduate Program on Forced Migration & Refugee Studies.  She has served as the Director of Chicago Public School’s International Newcomer Center for recently arrived refugee and immigrant high school students and as the Executive Director of the International Organization for Adolescents (IOFA), a leading organization in the U.S. working for the protection of child victims of human trafficking. Shana also served as the Director of Refugee & Immigrant Services at Heartland Alliance for Human Needs & Human Rights, coordinating both policy and program ends of the refugee and immigrant integration spectrum at three sites and developing nationally recognized vocational English language training models and youth leadership development initiatives. She has conducted field research and established projects addressing issues impacting vulnerable populations, including child soldiers, displaced children, landmine victims, and marginalized communities in Angola, Colombia, Eritrea, Mozambique, & South Africa, and warehoused refugee populations in Kenya and Tanzania. She holds a B.A. from DePaul University and an M.A. in African Studies with a focus on humanitarian assistance from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana.

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Course Expectations

Time Management and Attendance

SNL's online courses are not self-paced and require a regular time commitment EACH week throughout the quarter.

You are required to log in to your course at least four times a week so that you can participate in the ongoing course discussions.

Online courses are no less time consuming than "face to face" courses. You will have to dedicate some time every day or at least every second day to your studies. A typical four credit hour "face to face" course at SNL involves three hours of classroom meeting per week, plus at least three to six hours of study and homework per week.

This course will require at least the same time commitment, but your learning activities will be spread out through the week. If you have any problems with your technology, or if you need to improve your reading or writing skills, it may take even longer.

The instructor should be notified if your life events do not allow you to participate in the course and the online discussions for more than one week. This is particularly important when there are group discussions or you are working as part of a team.

If you find yourself getting behind, please contact the instructor immediately.

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Your Instructor's Role

Your instructor's role in this course is that of a discussion facilitator and learning advisor. It is not their responsibility to make sure you log in regularly and submit your assignments. As instructor, s/he will read all postings to the general discussion forums on a daily basis but may not choose to respond to each posting. You will receive feedback to assignments.

The instructor may choose to designate "office hours" when s/he will be online and available and will immediately respond to questions. Depending on the instructor, this response may be by e-mail, instant messenger or telephone. Otherwise, you will generally receive a response to emailed or posted queries within 48 hours.

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Your Role as a Student

As an online student, you will be taking a proactive approach to your learning. As the course instructor's role is that of a learning guide, your role is that of the leader in your own learning.

You will be managing your own time so that you can complete the readings, activities and assignments for the course, and you will also be expected to take a more active role in peer learning.

Please also note that this is a course offered by DePaul University's School for New Learning (SNL), a college for undergraduate and graduate degree-seeking students 24 years and older. SNL welcomes the perspectives and encourages the participation of all DePaul students, and students who take this course should respect and be mindful of SNL's mission in supporting a diverse and inclusive environment. More information about SNL can be found here.

View this brief demo Taking SNL Online courses in D2L to learn how to navigate through your course.

If you’re new to SNL Online see additional resources on the course home page under Student Resources/Getting Started.

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Course Netiquette

Online discussions are an important part of your course experience. To ensure a positive learning environment, please follow the following minimum expectations. Use your common sense, as not all situations can be covered:

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Policies

Academic Integrity

DePaul University is a learning community that fosters the pursuit of knowledge and the transmission of ideas within a context that emphasizes a sense of responsibility for oneself, for others and for society at large. Violations of academic integrity, in any of their forms, are, therefore, detrimental to the values of DePaul, to the students' own development as responsible members of society, and to the pursuit of knowledge and the transmission of ideas.

Violations include but are not limited to the following categories: cheating; plagiarism; fabrication; falsification or sabotage of research data; destruction or misuse of the university's academic resources; alteration or falsification of academic records; and academic misconduct. Conduct that is punishable under the Academic Integrity Policy could result in additional disciplinary actions by other university officials and possible civil or criminal prosecution. Please refer to your Student Handbook for further details.

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Plagiarism

Plagiarism is a major form of academic dishonesty involving the presentation of the work of another as one's own. Plagiarism includes but is not limited to the following:

Plagiarism, like other forms of academic dishonesty, is always a serious matter. If an instructor finds that a student has plagiarized, the appropriate penalty is at the instructor's discretion.

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DePaul University Incomplete Policy

The intent of the Incomplete grade is to allow students extra time to complete their final assignments. This need arises because, in the closing weeks of the course, they have an event of significant magnitude that adversely affects their ability to complete the course, e.g. serious illness, death in the family, overseas deployment, or natural disaster.

You must request an incomplete grade in writing two weeks before the end of the quarter. Incomplete grades will be considered only after you have satisfactorily completed at least 75 percent of the coursework, and you have such an unexpected, uncontrollable event that prevents you from completing your course. Do not assume that you will qualify for an incomplete. Students who are failing the course at the point where they request an incomplete will not receive one, nor will they be granted after the end of the quarter. Incomplete grades are given at the discretion of the instructor.

If you do receive permission from the instructor to take an incomplete in the course, you will be required to complete a contract with the instructor, specifying how you will finish the missing work within the next two quarters (excluding summer). See the Incomplete Grade Contract Form.

Undergraduate and graduate students will have up to two quarters to complete an incomplete. At the end of the second quarter (excluding summer) following the term in which the incomplete grade was assigned, remaining incompletes will automatically convert to "F" grades. Ordinarily no incomplete grade may be completed after the grace period has expired. Instructors may not change incomplete grades after the end of the grace period without the permission of a college-based Exceptions Committee. This policy applies to undergraduate, graduate and professional programs. NOTE: In the case of a student who has applied for graduation and who has been approved for an Incomplete in his or her final term, the incomplete must be resolved within the four-week grace period before final degree certification.

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Description of Pass/Fail Grading Options

Students have the option of taking all SNL undergraduate courses as Pass/Fail even if a class is initially structured for a letter grade assessment. In these cases a Pass is awarded when competence is demonstrated at a level that would otherwise earn a grade of C- or higher.

In deciding to select Pass/Fail grading students should be aware that competencies assessed in a course as Pass will earn credit hours toward degree completion but will not be included in computing grade point averages. Attempted competence demonstration assessed within a class as Fail will not only be recorded as credit hours attempted but will also be included in computing a student's grade point average.

For SNL students, competencies awarded for Independent Learning Pursuits and in the Lifelong Learning Domain do not count toward the university's specification that only twenty credit hours may be earned through the Pass/Fail assessment option.

Please note:There are three SNL courses within the BA curriculum that are always assessed on a Pass/Fail basis: Foundations of Adult Learning (course number LL 250; competences L-2 and F-1), Advanced Project (course number FA 303; competences F-11 and F-12) and Summit Seminar (course number LL 390; competence L-12). These classes may not be taken for a letter grade assessment. Therefore, work that might otherwise be assessed at grades A through C- will earn a Pass in these classes.

There are an additional five SNL courses within the Lifelong Learning Area of the BA curriculum for which instructors regularly use a Pass/Fail grading system that may instead be taken for a letter grade assessment if this is a student's preference. These classes are: Independent Learning Seminar (course number LL 103; competence L1); Writing for Competence (course number LL 260; competence L-4), Critical Thinking (course number LL 270; competence L-5), Research Seminar (course number LL 300; competences L-8 and L-9), and Externship (course number LL 302; competences L-10 and L-11). In addition, SNL's undergraduate Writing Workshop (course number LL 140; competence H-3-J) regularly uses Pass/Fail, although students may request a letter grade assessment. In these instances SNL offers undergraduate students the opportunity to request a letter grade assessment from their instructor. Students who need a letter grade for tuition reimbursement may wish to consider this option, as well as those who wish to raise their GPA. Students planning to attend graduate school may also prefer letter grades to Pass/Fail assessments.

If a student wants to switch the method of assessment, either to or from the Pass/Fail option, this must be requested from the instructor in writing by the beginning of the third week of the quarter. For courses that meet fewer than ten weeks of the quarter, this request must be made by the beginning of the third week of the course. The grading basis may not be changed after these deadlines, with no exceptions.

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For Students Who Need Accommodations Based on the Impact of a Disability

Students seeking disability-related accommodations are required to register with DePaul's Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD) enabling you to access accommodations and support services to assist your success. There are two office locations:

Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD)
Loop Campus: Lewis Center 1420. (312) 362-8002
Lincoln Park Campus: Student Center 370. (773) 325-1677
csd@depaul.edu

Students are also invited to contact their instructor privately to discuss your challenges and how the instructor may assist in facilitating the accommodations you will use in this course. This is best done early in the term and the conversation will remain confidential.

Dean of Students Office

The Dean of Students Office (DOS) helps students in navigating the university, particularly during difficult situations, such as personal, financial, medical, and/or family crises. Absence Notifications to faculty, Late Withdrawals, and Community Resource Referrals, support students both in and outside of the classroom. Additionally we have resources and programs to support health and wellness, violence prevention, substance abuse and drug prevention, and LGBTQ student services. We are committed to your success as a DePaul student. Please feel free to contact us.

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Protection of Human Subjects

For more information see: http://research.depaul.edu/

Demonstrating the acquisition of competencies in this course can involve "interactions"—interviewing and or observing other people—discussing those interviews or observations with other class members and writing them up in one or more final report(s). As such, these activities qualify as "research" with "human subjects" and are subject to University and Federal guidelines. Because it takes place in the context of this course, your research is exempt from approval by the School for New Learning's Local Review Board only under the following conditions:

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Copyright and Student Privacy

In accordance with DePaul’s Acceptable Use Policy, commentary and materials within SNL Online classes shall not be copied, reproduced or published elsewhere without the express written consent of individuals involved.

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10. Credits

This course was designed and produced by Shana Wills and staff at SNL Online of the School for New Learning of DePaul University.

©2015 School for New Learning, DePaul University. All Rights Reserved by SNL during contractual interval with the Author.

Printed in the USA.

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